Reba McEntire


Reba Nell McEntire (born March 28, 1955), also known simply as Reba, is an American country music singer, songwriter, record producer, actress, and television producer. She began her career in the music industry as a high school student singing in the Kiowa High School band, on local radio shows with her siblings, and at rodeos. While a sophomore in college, she performed the National Anthem at the National Rodeo in Oklahoma City and caught the attention of country artist Red Steagall who brought her to Nashville, Tennessee. She signed a contract with Mercury Records a year later in 1975. She released her first solo album in 1977 and released five additional studio albums under the label until 1983.

Signing with MCA Nashville Records, McEntire took creative control over her second MCA album, My Kind of Country (1984), which had a more traditional country sound and produced two number one singles: "How Blue" and "Somebody Should Leave". The album brought her breakthrough success, bringing her a series of successful albums and number one singles in the 1980s and 1990s. McEntire has since released 26 studio albums, acquired 40 number one singles, 14 number one albums, and 28 albums have been certified gold, platinum or multiplatinum in sales by the Recording Industry Association of America. She has sometimes been referred to as "The Queen of Country". and she is one of the best-selling artists of all time, having sold more than 85 million records worldwide.

In the early 1990s, McEntire branched into film starting with 1990's Tremors. She has since starred in the Broadway revival of Annie Get Your Gun and in her television sitcom, Reba (2001–07) for which she was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series -  Musical or Comedy. On July 13, 2016, she was a guest judge on NBC's America's Got Talent Judge Cuts.


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by Jim Casey | @TheJimCasey  |  July 25, 2018

Reba McEntire Named 2018 Kennedy Center Honoree for Lifetime Artistic Achievement 

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts announced that Reba McEntire will be one of the four honorees at the 2018 Kennedy Center Honors.

 

Reba will follow in the hallowed footsteps of past Kennedy honorees Merle Haggard, Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson, Loretta Lynn and more.

 

“The Kennedy Center Honors recognizes exceptional artists who have made enduring and indelible marks on our culture,” said Kennedy Center chairman David M. Rubenstein. “Country songstress Reba McEntire has inspired us over four decades with her powerhouse voice and music that conveys heartfelt, heart-warming honesty.”

 

In addition to Reba, the 2018 class includes Cher, Philip Glass and Wayne Shorter

 


The 41st Kennedy Center Honors ceremony takes place on Dec. 2 in Washington, D.C. The show will be broadcast on CBS on Dec. 26 at 9 p.m. ET.

Reba’s Kennedy Center Honors’ bio is below.

Multi-media entertainment mogul Reba McEntire has become a household name through a flourishing career that spans music, television, film, theater, and retail. She marked her 13th summit as "Sing It Now: Songs of Faith & Hope" topped both the Billboard Country and Christian/Gospel charts, bolstering McEntire’s successful record of 35 No. 1 singles and over 56 million albums sold worldwide across four decades. The double-disc collection earned McEntire her third Grammy Award® and first GMA Dove Award. The Country Music Hall of Fame, Grand Ole Opry, and Hollywood Bowl member has also won 16 ACM Awards, 15 American Music Awards, 9 People’s Choice Awards, and 6 CMA Awards. Her leadership and philanthropic endeavors have been recognized with the Andrea Bocelli Foundation Humanitarian Award, Leadership Music Dale Franklin Award, the Music Biz Chairman’s Award, the National Artistic Achievement Award from the U.S. Congress, and with joining the Horatio Alger Association.

 

McEntire returned for the 15th time to host the ACM Awards in April and led the 2017 ratings-high CMA Country Christmas television special. In 2005, she partnered with Dillard’s to launch her own lifestyle brand, and launched the REBA by Justin™ collection at select retailers nationwide for holiday 2017. The Oklahoma native is an acclaimed actress with 11 movie credits to her name, a lead on Broadway in "Annie Get Your Gun", and starred in the six-season television sitcom, Reba. As part of the longest-running Country act in "The Colosseum’s history", she will join with superstar pals for another round of Reba, Brooks & Dunn: Together in Vegas at Caesars.

 

photo by Tammie Arroyo, AFF-USA.com


by Jim Casey | @TheJimCasey  |  July 13, 2017

Reba McEntire Sells Nashville-Area Estate for $5 Million

Reba McEntire sold her lakefront estate in Lebanon, Tenn. (175 Cherokee Dock Rd Lebanon TN 37087, 30 miles east of Nashville) for $5 million, according to bizjournals.com.

 

The 83-acre property, known as Starstruck Farm, features a 12,816-squarefoot home with seven bedrooms, five full bathrooms, chef’s kitchen, home theater, wine room, eight-car garage, tennis court, pool, guest house, barn, equestrian center with indoor and outdoor riding areas and more. The estate includes frontage on Old Hickory Lake.

Reba listed the house in August 2016 for $7.9 million, before settling for $5 million.


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by Lisa Konicki | @LisaKon127  |  March 16, 2017

Reba Remembers Band Members Who Died in Plane Crash 26 Years Ago

It was 26 years ago today (March 16) that Reba suffered a deep loss when eight members of her band lost their lives in a fatal plane crash.

 

The accident occurred shortly after the plane carrying the band had taken off from Brown Field, a private airport outside San Diego. Reba recalled the incident in her 1994 memoir, Reba; My Story.

 

In an interview with Country Weekly, Reba revealed, “I found solace in the Lord and in my music. Even after I finished writing about it and rereading it hundreds of ties, it never got easier.”

 

Remembering her band today, Reba posted a message about the crash on her social media accounts.

 

“How time flies,” she wrote in the post. “26 years ago our friends went to sit on the right hand side of God. I love and miss them. 


Can you imagine the wonderful music they’re playing up there? And Jim making sure everything is set up just right?:))) God takes the best. He has great taste. #loveandmissthem”. - Our thoughts are with Reba on this sad day.


by Lisa Konicki | @LisaKon127  |  February 3, 2017

Reba McEntire Leaves New Gospel Album, “Sing It Now: Songs of Faith & Hope,” in the Hands of God

It has finally arrived. Today (Feb. 3) is the day that Reba McEntire’s highly anticipated gospel album, Sing It Now, Songs of Faith & Hope, is available to the public via iTunes, but the Oklahoma native says she can’t take credit for the idea of the record.

“Well, it wasn’t my idea,” Reba tells Nash Country Daily. 

 


“I can’t take the credit for that at all but I do believe that timing is everything and everything happens for a reason. Bill Carter, who was my manager in the mid ’80s, he talked to me and said, ‘Reba, you really need to do an inspirational album. Now’s the time.’ Then Tony Brown, who produced lots of my albums, starting in the ’90s, came up and said, ‘I agree with Bill. You need to do a gospel album.’ I said, ‘Well. I guess I better.’ Everybody was for it so I started looking for songs and there you have it.

 

The two-disc set - which contains 10 gospel classics on disc 1 and 10 new original tunes on disc 2 - features Reba’s latest single, “Back to God.” Written by Dallas Davidson and Randy Houser, Reba created an ethereal video to go along with the song.

 

Picking a favorite song from the album is difficult for Reba. The tracks are made up of a combination of her favorite gospel songs that she’s been collecting over the years and those that elicit sweet memories for the spiritual redhead.

 

 

“They are all my favorites,” says Reba of the albums tracks. “I mean, when you go to look for songs, they’ve got to really touch your heart. I learned a long time ago, don’t ever record a song that you don’t like because it’ll become a single, hopefully, and then if you don’t like it, you got to keep singing it for the rest of your life. I always try to pick songs that I really do like.“I had been hoarding songs for a long time. ‘God and My Girlfriends’ I’d had for years. ‘I Need to Talk to You,’ for years. Then of course, the old songs,” adds Reba of the selection process. “I went back to the hymnal that I had from Chockie, Oklahoma, and started going through that and picking out all the songs that I was familiar with. Ones that brought memories back to where Gramma Smith and Grandpa Smith would be singing at the little Chockie church in Chockie, Oklahoma. It was just memories. Great memories and then putting those songs together.”


Background informationFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Early life

Reba Nell McEntire was born March 28, 1955, in McAlester, Oklahoma, to Jacqueline (née Smith; born November 6, 1926) and Clark Vincent McEntire (November 30, 1927 - October 23, 2014 [5] ). She was named for her maternal grandmother Reba Estelle Smith (née Brasfield; October 6, 1903 – May 12, 1970). Reba Smith was the daughter of Byron Williams "B.W." Brasfield (May 13, 1874 - September 12, 1906) and Susie Elizabeth Brasfield (née Raper; February 2, 1871 - April 18, 1935).

 

Her father and grandfather, John Wesley McEntire (February 19, 1897 - February 13, 1976), were both champion steer ropers and her father was a World Champion Steer Roper three times (1957, 1958, and 1961). John McEntire was the son of Clark Stephen McEntire (September 10, 1855 - August 15, 1935) and Helen Florida McEntire (née Brown; May 19, 1868 - May 16, 1947). Her mother had once wanted to be a country-music artist but eventually decided to become a schoolteacher, but she did teach her children how to sing. Reba reportedly taught herself how to play the guitar. On car rides home from their father's rodeo shows, the McEntire siblings learned songs and harmonies from their mother, eventually forming a vocal group called the "Singing McEntires" with her brother, Pake, and her younger sister Susie (her older sister Alice did not participate). Reba played guitar in the group and wrote all the songs. The group sang at rodeos and recorded "The Ballad of John McEntire" together. Released on the indie label Boss, the song pressed one thousand copies.

In 1974, McEntire attended Southeastern Oklahoma State University planning to be an elementary school teacher (eventually graduating December 16, 1976). While not attending school, she also continued to sing locally. That same year she was hired to perform the national anthem at the National Rodeo in Oklahoma City. Country artist Red Steagall, who was also performing that day, was impressed by her vocal ability and agreed to help her launch a country-music career in Nashville, Tennessee. After recording a demo tape, she signed a recording contract with Mercury Records in 1975.

 

Music career

1976–83: Career launch at Mercury

McEntire made her first recordings for Mercury on January 22, 1976, when she released her debut single. Upon its release that year, "I Don't Want to Be a One Night Stand" failed to become a major hit on the Billboard country music chart, peaking at number 88 in May. She completed her second recording session September 16, which included the production of her second single, "(There's Nothing Like The Love) Between a Woman and Man", which reached only number 86 in March 1977. She recorded a third single that April, "Glad I Waited Just for You", which reached number 88 by August. That same month, Mercury issued her self-titled debut album. The album was a departure from any of McEntire's future releases, as it resembled the material of Tanya Tucker and Tammy Wynette, according to AllMusic reviewer Greg Adams. The album itself did not chart the Billboard Top Country Albums chart upon its release. After releasing two singles with Jacky Ward ("Three Sheets in the Wind" b/w "I'd Really Love to See You Tonight"; and "That Makes Two of Us" at No. 20 and No. 26, respectively), Mercury issued her second studio album in 1979, "Out of a Dream". The album's cover of Patsy Cline's "Sweet Dreams" became McEntire's first Top 20 hit, reaching No. 19 on the Billboard country chart in November 1979.

In 1980, "You Lift Me Up (To Heaven)" brought her to the Top 10 for the first time. Her third studio album, "Feel the Fire" was released in October and spawned two additional Top 20 hit singles that year. In September 1981, McEntire's fourth album, "Heart to Heart" was issued and became her first album to chart the Billboard Top Country Albums list, peaking at No. 2. Its lead single, "Today All Over Again" became a top five country hit. The album received mainly negative reviews from critics. William Ruhlman of AllMusic gave it two-and-a-half out of five stars, stating she did not get creative control of her music. Ruhlman called "There Ain't No Love" "essentially a soft pop ballad". Most of the album's material consisted of mainly country pop-styled ballads, which was not well liked by McEntire herself.

Her fifth album, "Unlimited" was issued in June 1982, and spawned her first Billboard number one single in early 1983: "Can't Even Get the Blues" and "You're the First Time I've Thought About Leaving". The following year her sixth album, "Behind the Scene" was released and was positively received by music critics.

In 1983, McEntire announced her departure from Mercury, criticizing the label's country pop production styles.

 

1984–90: Breakthrough

McEntire signed with MCA Nashville Records in 1984 and released her seventh studio album, "Just a Little Love". Harold Shedd was originally the album's producer; however, McEntire rejected his suggestions towards country pop arrangements. It was instead produced by Norro Wilson, although the album still had a distinguishable country pop sound. Dissatisfied with the album's sound, she went to MCA president, Jimmy Bowen, who told McEntire to find material that was best-suited to her liking. Instead of finding new material, she found previously recorded country hits from her own record collection, which was then recorded for the album. The album's material included songs originally released as singles by Ray Price ("Don't You Believe Her", "I Want to Hear It from You"), Carl Smith ("Before I Met You"), Faron Young ("He's Only Everything") and Connie Smith ("You've Got Me [Right Where You Want Me"]). The album spawned two number-one singles: "How Blue" and "Somebody Should Leave". It was given positive reviews from critics, with Billboard praising McEntire as "the finest woman country singer since Kitty Wells" and Rolling Stone critics honoring her as one of their Top 5 favorite country artists. Upon its release, "My Kind of Country" became her highest-peaking album on the Top Country Albums chart, reaching No. 13. The album also included instruments such as a fiddle and pedal steel guitar, and was aimed more towards a traditional country sound. McEntire was later praised as a "new traditionalist", along with Ricky Skaggs, George Strait, and Randy Travis. That year, she won the Country Music Association Awards' Female Vocalist of the Year, her first major industry award. The album was certified Gold.

In 1985, McEntire released her third MCA album, "Have I Got a Deal for You", which followed the same traditional format as My Kind of Country. It was the first album produced by McEntire and was co-produced with Jimmy Bowen. Like her previous release, the album received positive feedback, including Rolling Stone, which called it a "promising debut". The album's second single, "Only in My Mind" was entirely written by McEntire and reached No. 5 on the Billboard country chart. On January 17, 1986, McEntire became a member of the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee, and has been a member ever since. In February 1986, McEntire's ninth studio album, "Whoever's in New England" was released. For this album, McEntire and co-producer Jimmy Bowen incorporated her traditional music style into a mainstream sound that was entirely different from anything she had previously recorded. Country Music: The Rough Guide called the production of the title track, "bigger and sentimentalism more obvious, even manipulative". The title track peaked at No. 1 on the Billboard Country Chart and won her a Grammy Award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance the following year. In addition, the album became McEntire's first release to certify gold in sales by the Recording Industry Association of America (and was later certified Platinum). At the end of the year, McEntire won Entertainer of the Year from the Country Music Association, the highest honor in the awards show.

McEntire released a second album in 1986 (her tenth overall), "What Am I Gonna Do About You". Allmusic critic William Ruhlman was not overly pleased with album's production, saying that it lacked the features that had been set forth on Whoever's in New England. Rulhlman criticized the title track for "something of the feel of 'Whoever's in New England' in its portrayal of a woman trying to recover from a painfully ended love affair". The title track was the lead single from the release and became a numberone single shortly after its release. This album also spawned a second number-one in "One Promise Too Late". The following year, her first MCA compilation, "Greatest Hits" was released and became her first album to be certified platinum in sales, eventually certifying triple-platinum. A twelfth studio album, "The Last One to Know", was released in 1987. The emotions of her divorce from husband, Charlie Battles, were put into the album's material, according to McEntire. The title track from the release was a number-one single in 1987 and the second single, "Love Will Find Its Way to You", also reached the top spot. In late 1987, McEntire released her first Christmas collection, "Merry Christmas to You", which sold two million copies in the United States, certifying double Platinum. The album included cover versions of "Away in a Manger", "Silent Night", and Grandpa Jones's "The Christmas Guest".

Her thirteenth album, "Reba", was issued in 1988 and was not well received by critics, who claimed she was moving farther away from her "traditional country" sound. Stereo Review disliked the album's contemporary style, stating, "After years of insisting that she'd stick to hard-core country 'because I have tried the contemporary-type songs, and it's not Reba McEntire - it's just not honest,' McEntire[...]has gone whole-hog pop. The album peaked at No. 1 on the Top Country Albums chart and remained there for six consecutive weeks. Okay, so maybe that's not so terrible." Although it was reviewed poorly, the album itself was certified platinum in sales and produced two number-one singles: "I Know How He Feels" and "New Fool at an Old Game". In addition, the release's cover version of Jo Stafford's "A Sunday Kind of Love" became a Top 5 hit on the Billboard country music chart. Also in 1988, McEntire founded Starstruck Entertainment, which controlled her management, booking, publishing, promotion, publicity, accounting, ticket sales, and fan club administration. The company would eventually expand into managing a horse farm, jet charter service, trucking, construction, and book publishing

McEntire's fourteenth studio album, "Sweet Sixteen", was released in May 1989; it spent sixteen weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart, while also becoming her first album to peak in the top 100 on the Billboard 200, reaching No. 78. The album was given positive reviews because unlike her previous studio album, the release, "welcomes the fiddles and steel guitars back as she returns to the neo-traditionalist fold", according to Allmusic, which gave the release four-and-a-half out of five stars. Reviewer William Ruhlman found Sweet Sixteen to "double back to a formula that worked for her in the past". The lead single was a cover of The Everly Brothers' "Cathy's Clown", with McEntire's version reaching No. 1 in July on the Billboard country music chart. Three more Top 10 hits followed from "Sweet Sixteen": "Till Love Comes Again", "Little Girl", and "Walk On", at No. 4, 7 and 2, respectively. In September she released "Reba Live", her first live album, which originally certified gold but certified platinum ten years later.

 

 

Sixteen months after the release of "Sweet Sixteen" and after giving birth to her son, McEntire transitioned into 1990 with the release of "Rumor Has It". The album's "sound and production were almost entirely pop-oriented", according to Kurt Wolff of Country Music: The Rough Guide. Although "Rumor Has It" was an attempt to receive critical praise, many reviewers found the album to be "predictable". Stereo Review mainly found the recording displeasing in some places, but the reviewer also believed she "still leaves most of the competition in the dust", calling the album "glorious". "Rumor Has It" eventually sold three million copies by 1999, certifying triple-platinum by that year. It was prefaced by the single "You Lie", which became her fifteenth number-one single on the country chart. In addition, the album's cover of Bobbie Gentry's 1969 hit "Fancy" and a new track, "Fallin' Out of Love", became Top 10 hits on the same Billboard country chart

 

 

 

1991: Aviation accident and "For My Broken Heart"

 

While on tour for her 1990 album, McEntire lost eight members of her band; (Chris Austin, Kirk Cappello, Joey Cigainero, Paula Kaye Evans, Jim Hammon, Terry Jackson, Anthony Saputo, and Michael Thomas), plus pilot Donald Holmes and co-pilot Chris Hollinger, when their charter jet plane crashed near San Diego, California, in the early morning of March 16, 1991. The accident occurred after McEntire's private performance for IBM executives the night before. The first plane was a Hawker Siddeley DH-125-1A/522 charter jet, believed to have taken off around 1:45 AM from the Brown Field Municipal Airport, located near the border of Mexico. After reaching an altitude of about 3,572 feet (1,089 m) above sea level, the aircraft crashed on the side of Otay Mountain, located ten miles east of the airport, while the second plane (carrying her other band members) did not crash. The accident was believed to have occurred due to poor visibility near the mountain, which was not considered "prohibitive" for flying. The news was reported nearly immediately to McEntire and her husband, who were sleeping at a nearby hotel. A spokeswoman for McEntire at the time stated in the Los Angeles Times that "she was very close to all of them. Some of them had been with her for years. Reba is totally devastated by this. It's like losing part of your family. Right now she just wants to get back to Nashville."

McEntire dedicated her sixteenth album, "For My Broken Heart", to her deceased road band. Released in October 1991, it contained songs of sorrow and lost love about "all measure of suffering," according to Alanna Nash of Entertainment Weekly. Nash reported that McEntire "still hits her stride with the more traditional songs of emotional turmoil, above all combining a spectacular vocal performance with a terrific song on 'Buying Her Roses,' a wife's head-spinning discovery of her husband's other woman." The release peaked at No. 1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart, while also reaching No. 13 on the Billboard 200, and eventually sold four million copies. Its title track became McEntire's sixteenth number-one, followed by "Is There Life Out There", which also reached No. 1 on the Billboard country music chart. The third single, "The Greatest Man I Never Knew," peaked in the Top 5 and her cover of Vicki Lawrence's "The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia" reached No. 12. "If I Had Only Known," a cut from this album, was later included in the soundtrack to the 1994 film 8 Seconds.

1992-96: Continued success

In December 1992, McEntire's seventeenth studio album, "It's Your Call", was released. It became her first album to peak within the Billboard 200 Top 10, reaching No. 8. McEntire commented that the record was a "second chapter" to "For My Broken Heart", while music reviewers such as Alanna Nash of Entertainment Weekly disagreed, writing, "In truth, it isn't nearly as pessimistic as its predecessor - and unfortunately it isn't anywhere as involving." Nash called the album's title track - which peaked at No. 5 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart - "one of those moment-of-truth sagas at which McEntire excels. In the song, a wife answers the phone to find her husband's girlfriend on the other end and seizes the opportunity not only to inform her mate that she knows of his affair but to give him the ultimatum of choosing between the two. She's not the only one who's waitin' on the line, she sings, handing her husband the phone. "It's your call." Christopher John Farley of Time magazine wrote that the album ranged from being "relaxing" to "cathartic", and "these vocals from one of the best country singers linger in the mind". The album's preceding singles - "The Heart Won't Lie" (a duet with then-labelmate Vince Gill) and "Take It Back" - were Top 10 hits on the Billboard country chart, reaching No. 1 and No. 5 respectively. Like its preceding album, "It's Your Call" sold over a million copies, eventually certifying by the RIAA in sales of double-platinum.

In October 1993, McEntire's third compilation album, "Greatest Hits Volume Two" was released, reaching No. 1 and No. 5 on the Billboard Top Country Albums and Billboard 200 charts respectively, selling 183,000 copies during Christmas week 1993. Out of the ten tracks were two new singles: the first, "Does He Love You", was a duet with Linda Davis. The song later went on to reach No. 1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart and win both women a Grammy for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals. Its second single, "They Asked About You", was also a Top 10 hit. The additional eight songs were some of McEntire's biggest hit singles during a course of five years including "The Last One to Know", "I Know How He Feels", "Cathy's Clown", and "The Heart Won't Lie". After originally selling two million copies upon its initial release (2× Multi-Platinum), "Greatest Hits Volume Two" would later certify at 5× Multi-Platinum by the RIAA in 1998. The album has gone to sell over 10 million copies worldwide, which makes it McEntire's best selling album to date.

Her eighteenth studio release was 1994's "Read My Mind". The album spawned five major hit singles onto the Billboard Country chart, including the No. 1 single "The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter". The further releases ("Till You Love Me", "Why Haven't I Heard from You", and "And Still") became Top 10 singles on the same chart, with "Till You Love Me" also reaching No. 78 on the Billboard Hot 100, a chart that she had not previously entered. The album itself reached No. 2 on both the Billboard 200 and Top Country Albums charts. Charlotte Dillon of Allmusic gave the album four out of five stars, calling it "another wonderful offering of songs performed by the gifted country singer Reba McEntire". Dillon also felt that the album's material had "a little soul, a little swing, and some pop, too". Entertainment Weekly's Alanna Nash also gave the album positive feedback, viewing the album to have "enough boiling rhythms and brooding melodies to reflect the anger and disillusionment of the middle class in the '90s", calling the track "She Thinks His Name Was John" to be the best example of that idea. The song was eventually spawned as a single and was considered controversial for its storyline, which described a woman who contracts AIDS from a one-night stand. Because of its subject, the song garnered less of a response from radio and peaked at No. 15. "Read My Mind" became another major seller for McEntire and her label, selling three million copies by 1995 and certifying at 3× Multi-Platinum from the RIAA.

After many years of releasing studio albums of newly recorded material, McEntire's nineteenth studio album, "Starting Over" (1995) was collection of her favorite songs originally recorded by others from the 1950s through the early 1980s. The album was made to commemorate twenty years in the music industry, but many music critics gave it a less positive response than her previous release. Allmusic's Stephen Thomas Erlewine commented that although the album was considered a "rebirth" for McEntire, he thought that some tracks were recorded for merely "nothing more than entertainment". The album paid tribute to many of McEntire's favorite artists and included cover versions of "Talking In Your Sleep" originally sung by Crystal Gayle, "Please Come to Boston", "I Won't Mention It Again" sung by Ray Price, "Starting Over Again", cowritten by Donna Summer and originally a hit for Dolly Parton, "On My Own", and "By the Time I Get to Phoenix".  "On My Own" featured guest vocals from Davis, as well as Martina McBride and Trisha Yearwood.

Despite negative reviews, "Starting Over" was certified Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America within the first two months of its release, but only one single - a cover of Lee Greenwood's "Ring on Her Finger, Time on Her Hands" - was a Top 10 hit single.

1997–98: "What If It's You" and "If You See Him"

McEntire made a major comeback into the music industry the following year with her twentieth studio album, "What If It's You". The album's lead single, "The Fear of Being Alone" reached No. two on the country charts, and its further two singles ("How Was I to Know" and "I'd Rather Ride Around with You") reached No. 1 and No. 2 respectively. The release garnered higher critical acclaim than "Starting Over", with Thom Owens of Allmusic calling the album "nevertheless an excellent reminder of her deep talents as a vocalist". MCA Nashville chairman Bruce Hinton told Billboard how pleased he was with McEntire's release, calling the album's ten tracks "powerful" and concluding by stating, "There are so many writers and so many great songs in Nashville, and Reba has collected her disproportionate share[...]She's country music's female artist of the 90's. "What If It's You" peaked at No. 1 Top Country Albums and No. 15 on the Billboard 200, while also becoming her first album in three years to certify in multiplatinum sales, selling two million copies by 1999. At the end of 1997, McEntire also charted at No. 23 the charity single "What If". The proceeds of sales for this single were donated to the Salvation Army.

In 1997, McEntire headlined a tour with Brooks & Dunn that led to the recording of "If You See Him/If You See Her" with the duo the following year. This song was included on McEntire's "If You See Him" album and Brooks & Dunn's "If You See Her" album, both of which released on June 2. Thom Owens of AllMusic reported in its review that both album titles were named nearly the same as "a way to draw attention for both parties, since they were no longer new guns - they were veterans in danger of losing ground to younger musicians". The duet reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart in June 1998 and spawned an additional three Top 10 hits during that year: "Forever Love", "Wrong Night", and "One Honest Heart". In addition, "If You See Him" peaked within the Top 10 on both the Billboard 200 and Top Country Albums chart, reaching No. 8 and No. 2, respectively.


1999-2001: "So Good Together" and "Greatest Hits Vol. 3: I'm A Survivor"

In 1999, McEntire released two albums. In September she issued her second Christmas album, "The Secret of Giving: A Christmas Collection", which eventually sold 500,000 copies in the United States. In November, her twenty-second studio album, "So Good Together" was released, spawning three singles. The first release, "What Do You Say" and the second release, "I'll Be" both reached the Top 5 on the Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart. "So Good Together" also brought her into the Top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100 for the first time, peaking at No. 31. The album would eventually certify Platinum by the end of the decade. "What Do You Say" became her first crossover hit as well. Unlike any of her previous albums, "So Good Together" was produced by three people, including McEntire. Entertainment Weekly commented that most of the album's material was "an odd set - mostly ballads, including an English/Portuguese duet with Jose e Durval on Boz Scaggs' 'We're All Alone'"."

 

In 2001, McEntire returned with her third greatest-hits album: "Greatest Hits Vol. 3: I'm a Survivor". The album helped McEntire receive her third gold certification from the Recording Industry Association of America, which made her the most certified female country artist in music history. It spawned the number-three hit "I'm a Survivor", which would be her last major hit for two years, as McEntire would go on a temporary hiatus to focus on her television sitcom, "Reba". The album's only other single, a cover of Kenny Rogers' "Sweet Music Man", went to No. 36.

2003-07: Return to the music industry

McEntire's seventy-sixth chart single, "I'm Gonna Take That Mountain", released in mid-2003, ended her two-year break from recording. In November 2003, her twenty-third studio album, "Room to Breathe", marked her first release of new material in four years. Writing for The Boston Globe, Steve Morse found the album's material to have a variety of musical stylings, saying the track "Love Revival" sounded like Tanya Tucker and calling "If I Had Any Sense at All" "a mournful country ballad". Dan MacIntosh of Country Standard Time gave "Room to Breathe" a less-received review, reporting that "it ultimately falls short of leaving the listener breathless". He highlighted "I'm Gonna Take That Mountain" for sounding like a Bluegrass-inspired song such as music by Ricky Skaggs or Patty Loveless. The album itself reached a peak of No. 4 on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart and No. 25 on the Billboard 200, staying at the position for only one week. The second single, "Somebody", also recorded by Mark Wills on his "Loving Every Minute" release, became her twenty-second number-one single on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart and first since "If You See Him/If You See Her" six years previous. This became her thirty-third number-one single overall. It took longer than expected to become a hit, according to McEntire, who said, "Yeah, that had us concerned. The album came out in November and it took 30 weeks for "Somebody" to work its way up the charts. Usually, it's 15 weeks. But this one had a resurgence of life, especially after the video came out. MCA is really kicking butt with it." Its third single, "He Gets That from Me" reached No. 7, followed by the Amy Dalley co-written track "My Sister", which reached No. 16.

In 2005, McEntire released the compilation "Reba 1's". The album comprised all thirty-three number-one hits in her career on all major trade charts. Two new songs were included on the album: "You're Gonna Be" and "Love Needs a Holiday". Both were released as singles, peaking at No. 33 and No. 60, respectively, with the latter becoming her first single in twenty-seven years to miss the country top 40 entirely. Country Standard Time called the tracks "Whoever's in New England" and "You Lie" the album highlights. The album reached a peak of No. 3 on the Top Country Albums chart and No. 12 on the Billboard 200 upon its release, certifying 2× Platinum by the RIAA within two years. On August 30, 2007, McEntire received two CMA nominations: Female Vocalist of the Year and Vocal Event of the Year. With those two nominations plus another in 2008 and two more in 2009, McEntire became the female artist with the most nominations (forty-eight) in the forty-three year history of the CMA Awards, surpassing Dolly Parton, who has forty-three.

In mid-2007, McEntire announced the release of her twenty-fifth studio album, "Reba: Duets", on September 18. McEntire stated that out of all the albums she had previously recorded, her newest release was particularly special: "This is an album that will go down in history as probably my favorite album to record because I got to work and sing and be with my friends. Out of everything in this whole career that I can say that I'm the most proud of, are my friends. And here's the proof." In promotion for the album, McEntire made appearances at radio shows and on The Oprah Winfrey Show September 19. The album's lead single, "Because of You" - a duet with Kelly Clarkson, who originally recorded the song - became her fifty-fifth Top 10 single on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart, tying her with Dolly Parton, who also had the same amount of Top 10 records. The album was given high critical praise from magazines such as PopMatters, which called McEntire's vocals, "to sound sweet without being syrupy, while being extremely powerful. McEntire's vocal strength yields a different kind of authority than the bluesy, drawling growl of Janis Joplin, the weathered rasp of Marianne Faithfull, or even the soul-shrieking powerhouse of Tina Turner. Instead, Reba's voice combines the aspects of all three singers but tempers it with a Southern sweetness and an unmistakable femininity." The album contained ten tracks of duets with country and pop artists, including Kenny Chesney, LeAnn Rimes, Trisha Yearwood, Carole King, and Justin Timberlake. "Reba: Duets" peaked at No. 1 on the Top Country Albums chart, while also becoming her first album in her thirty-year career to peak and debut at No. 1 on the Billboard 200, with 300,536 copies (according to Nielsen Soundscan) sold within its first week of release. On January 17, 2008, McEntire embarked on the 2 Worlds 2 Voices Tour with Clarkson, which began in Fairborn, Ohio and ended in November of the same year. A month after its release, the album was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America on October 19, 2007. The album's only other single was "Every Other Weekend". Recorded on the album as a duet with Chesney, it was released to radio with its co-writer, Skip Ewing, as a duet partner.

2008-12: Move to Valory

In early 2008, McEntire partnered again with Brooks & Dunn for a re-recorded version of their single "Cowgirls Don't Cry". McEntire is featured in the video, but not on the version found on the album "Cowboy Town". It became McEntire's fifty-sixth Top Ten country hit, breaking Dolly's record for the most Top Ten country hits for a solo female.

In November 2008, McEntire announced that she would be departing from her label of twenty-five years and signing with the Valory Music Group, an imprint of Big Machine Records (coincidentally distributed by MCA and Mercury's parent, Universal Music Group). Under MCA, she had sold a total of sixty-seven million records worldwide and won two Grammys. The switch to Valory reunited McEntire with the label's president, Scott Borchetta, who had worked as senior vice president of promotion at MCA during most of the 1990s. McEntire later commented on her label switch, stating, "I am thrilled to be joining the Valory team. Scott and I worked together on some of the biggest singles of my career, and I am excited to renew our partnership." In November, 2008, MCA released a "50 Greatest Hits" box set compilation album, containing three CDs, from 1984's "How Blue" to 2007's "Because of You".

On April 5, 2009, McEntire debuted her first single, "Strange", on Valory at the 2009 Academy of Country Music Awards. The song debuted at No. 39 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart, giving McEntire the highest single debut of her career, and went on to peak at No. 11. Her twenty-sixth studio album, "Keep On Loving You" was released August 18, 2009, and became McEntire's first solo studio album in six years. The album gained fairly positive reviews from most album critics. On August 26, "Keep on Loving You" became McEntire's second album to top both the Billboard Country and 200 charts, selling almost 96,000 copies within its first week. With the album, McEntire broke the record for the female country artist with the most Billboard number-one albums, which was previously held by Loretta Lynn.

 

On August 18 the label released the album's second single, "Consider Me Gone", and it debuted at No. 51 on The Hot Country Single's Chart. The single became McEntire's thirty-fourth number-one on the Billboard chart in December. With a four-week stay at No. 1, this song became the longest-lasting number-one of her career, as well as the first multi-week number-one by a female country singer since Taylor Swift's "Our Song" in 2007. The album's third and final single was "I Keep On Loving You", co-written by Ronnie Dunn of Brooks & Dunn, which peaked at No. 7.

McEntire's thirty-fourth studio album, "All the Women I Am", was released on November 9, 2010, under Valory Music Group/Starstruck Records. The album's lead single called "Turn On the Radio" was released on August 3, 2010, and the music video premiered on August 18, 2010. Upon its release, "All the Women I Am" received generally positive reviews from most music critics. At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, the album received an average score of 72, based on 4 reviews, which indicates "generally favorable reviews". On November 10, 2010, McEntire appeared at the Country Music Association Awards performing her version of Beyoncé's "If I Were a Boy".

 

On December 20, 2010, McEntire scored her 35th Billboard number-one single in the U.S. with "Turn On the Radio". The second single from "All the Women I Am" was a cover of Beyoncé's "If I Were a Boy", which McEntire took to No. 22. After it came "When Love Gets a Hold of You" at No. 40 and "Somebody's Chelsea" at No. 44. The latter was the only single that McEntire had co-written since "Only in My Mind" in 1985. McEntire later announced that she would be visiting 31 cities on her All the Women I Am Tour late that year with The Band Perry, Steel Magnolia, and Edens Edge as opening acts on different stops of the tour. Dates for the tour were announced July 6, 2011.

On March 1, 2011, the Country Music Association announced that McEntire would be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. McEntire was unable to attend the announcement after her father had slipped into a coma following a stroke. McEntire was inducted by Dolly Parton into the Country Music Hall of Fame on May 22, 2011, at a Medallion Ceremony at the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville.

2014-present: Nash Icon, "Love Somebody", Christmas and Gospel albums

On October 21, 2014, it was announced that McEntire would be the inaugural signing for Big Machine's new imprint Nash Icon Music. She also disclosed that she was working on a new album, with 11 new songs.

 

Her first single for the new label, "Going Out Like That", was announced December 16, 2014 and was released on January 6, 2015. It served as the lead-off single to "Love Somebody", McEntire's twenty-seventh studio album, released on April 14, 2015. "Love Somebody" debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums - her twelfth number-one album on the chart - and No. 3 on Billboard 200, selling 62,469 copies in the U.S. The album has sold 171,600 copies in the U.S. as of October 5, 2015.

 

In 2016, McEntire was selected as one of thirty artists to perform on "Forever Country", a mash-up track of "Take Me Home", "Country Roads", "On the Road Again" and "I Will Always Love You" which celebrates 50 years of the CMA Awards. McEntire released her third Christmas album "My Kind of Christmas" on September 2, 2016. The album is exclusively sold at Cracker Barrel and online. In conjunction, McEntire is also selling her own line of clothing, home decor, jewelry and other things also at Cracker Barrel

 

On December 15, 2016, McEntire announced that she is releasing her first Gospel album titled "Sing It Now: Songs of Faith & Hope". It is set for release on February 3, 2017, and will consist of two discs. Disc one will be traditional hymns while disc two will be original tracks. "Softly and Tenderly", featuring Kelly Clarkson and Trisha Yearwood, is the first single. Another track on the album, "In the Garden/Wonderful Peace", features The Isaacs. Jay DeMarcus of the Rascal Flatts produced the album. 


 

Grand Ole Opry

When Reba McEntire made her Grand Ole Opry debut on September 17, 1977, she almost did not make it in the door after a guard at the Opry gate missed her name on the night's list of performers. Her parents and older sister, Alice, drove 1,400 miles round trip from their Oklahoma home to see what turned out to be Reba's three-minute performance that night. Her act was cut from two songs to just one - "Invitation to the Blues" - because of a surprise appearance from Dolly Parton. McEntire was inducted into the Grand Ole Opry on January 17, 1986. "The Grand Ole Opry is a home," she says. "It's a family. It's like a family reunion, when you come back and get to see everybody."

 

Acting career

1989-99: Entry into film and television acting

During the late 1980s, many of McEntire's music videos were being described as "mini movies". In each video, she would portray a different character, which distinguished her music videos from other videos released by artists during that time. In the late 1980s, McEntire became interested in an acting career, eventually hiring an agent. In 1989, she co-hosted Good Morning America on ABC.

 

In 1990, she obtained her first film role playing Heather Gummer in the horror comedy Tremors, along with Kevin Bacon. The film told the story of a small group of people living in Nevada who were fighting subterranean worm-like creatures. After the film's release, McEntire developed a strong interest in acting and made it her second career. The following year, she starred along with Kenny Rogers and Burt Reynolds in the made-for-television movie, The Gambler Returns: The Luck of the Draw. In 1994, McEntire worked with director, Rob Reiner in the film, North, playing Ma Tex. The film obtained negative reviews, receiving only two and a half stars from Allmovie. [90]

 

In 1994, McEntire starred in Is There Life Out There?, a television movie based on her song of the same name. The following year, she appeared in Buffalo Girls, which was based upon the life of western cowgirl, Calamity Jane (played by Anjelica Huston). Playing Jane's friend, Annie Oakley, Buffalo Girls was nominated for an Emmy award. In 1996, McEntire was cast by director James Cameron as Molly Brown in his film Titanic. However, when it became apparent production for the film would extend well beyond its original length, McEntire had to turn down the part, as she had already scheduled prior concert engagements. The role was recast with Kathy Bates. In 1998, she starred as Lizzie Brooks in Forever Love, which was based upon McEntire's hit single of the same name.

2000-07: Broadway and television series

In early 2001, McEntire expanded into theater, starring in the Broadway revival of "Annie Get Your Gun". Playing Annie Oakley (whom she had previously portrayed in Buffalo Girls), her performance was critically acclaimed by several newspapers, including The New York Times, which commented, "Without qualification the best performance by an actress in a musical comedy this season." McEntire personally called the musical, "some of the hardest work I've ever done in my life".

 

In 2005, McEntire starred as Nellie Forbush in the Carnegie Hall concert production of the Broadway musical "South Pacific "with Alec Baldwin as Luther Billis and Brian Stokes Mitchell as Emile de Becque, directed by Walter Bobbie and with an adapted script by David Ives. The concert was broadcast as part of the Great Performances series in 2006. 

 

In October 2001, McEntire premiered her half-hour television sitcom "Reba" on the WB network. The show was based around divorced mother Reba Hart, who learns how to handle life situations after her husband divorces her and their teenage daughter becomes pregnant. Reba garnered critical acclaim and success, becoming the network's highest-rated television show for adults ranging from the ages of eighteen to forty nine. The show ran for six seasons and earned McEntire a nomination for a Golden Globe award. It was cancelled on February 18, 2007; the series finale had 8.7 million viewers.

2011: Return to television

In September 2011, McEntire confirmed on her website that ABC had ordered a pilot for her second television series, "Malibu Country". McEntire would play a divorced mother of two who moves to Malibu, California to restart her music career. The pilot was filmed in April 2012 and began production on its first season in August. It was announced that the pilot for "Malibu Country" would premiere November 2, 2012. The show then began showing every Friday night at 8:30/7:30c on ABC. On May 11, 2012, McEntire tweeted that the show had been picked up. She also was the host in the 2011 NASCAR Award Show in Las Vegas.

Despite reports that "Malibu Country" was the most-watched freshman comedy in its debut season (8.7 million), the show was canceled on May 10, 2013, after eighteen episodes.

2017: Second return to television

In January, 2017, it was announced that McEntire will star and produce the untitled Southern drama series for ABC. The project was created by Marc Cherry, who best known as Desperate Housewives creator. McEntire plays the leading role of Ruby Adair, the sheriff of colorful small town Oxblood, Kentucky.

 

Musical styles and legacy

McEntire's sound has been influenced by the country music of Bob Wills, Merle Haggard, Dolly Parton, Barbara Mandrell, and Patsy Cline. In college, McEntire would attend local dances at the Oklahoma - Texas border so she could dance to Wills's music, commenting that, "it didn't get any better than dancing to Bob Wills music". She also explained Merle Haggard's influence on her career, stating "I had every album he ever put out", and would sing "every song he did", along with her brother, Pake and sister, Susie. In addition, her first major hit, "Sweet Dreams" was a remake of Patsy Cline's version of the song, according to McEntire herself. McEntire's music has been described to not only be built upon traditional country music, but also expand into the genres of Country pop, Mainstream pop, Soul, Adult Contemporary, and R&B. At times, her music has often been criticized for moving away from traditional country music. Many music critics have often called her music to be "melodramatic", "formulaic", and "bombastic", particularly after her 1988 album, "Reba". Studio releases such as "Sweet Sixteen", "Rumor Has It", "It's Your Call", and "Starting Over" have often been described by these terms.

McEntire possesses a contralto vocal range and performs "vocal gymnastics" with her voice, a musical technique in which a singer twirls a note around, using their vibrato. McEntire has often credited Dolly Parton for influencing this trait, stating that she would always listen to Parton's records and find her style of vocal gymnastics, "so pretty".

McEntire has often been regarded as one of country music's most influential female vocalists and most beloved entertainers.   She is highly credited for remaining one of country's most popular female artists for nearly four decades, maintaining her success by continually incorporating contemporary musical sounds without changing her traditional vocal style. For many new artists, she has been credited as the inspiration to their careers in country music, including Faith Hill, Martina McBride, Trisha Yearwood, and LeAnn Rimes. She has also been credited as an inspiration to other performers such as Sara Evans, Kelly Clarkson, Lee Ann Womack, Terri Clark, Taylor Swift, and Carrie Underwood, The Net Music Countdown second-handedly reported, "That influence has manifested itself in many ways. As a role model, she's shown others how to handle fame with grace and good humor while never backing down from her values or goals. Just as importantly, she's shown others to refuse to accept limitations on what she can do or how much she can achieve." McEntire also explained to the online website, "Whatever I'm doing, I feel like I'm representing country music". "It's always been my main career, and it's where my loyalties lie. I feel like I'm waving the flag of country music wherever I go, and I couldn't be prouder to do it."

 

Personal life

Two of her siblings have also had careers in the music industry. Her brother Pake dabbled in the country music industry in the late 80s but returned to Oklahoma after a brief stint. He owns and operates a 1,000 acre ranch near Coalgate, Oklahoma, and continues to rodeo. Her sister Susie is a successful Christian music singer who travels the country with her husband, speaking and performing. She also has an older sister, Alice Foran, a retired social worker who resides in Lane, Oklahoma. Her niece, Calamity McEntire, is an assistant basketball coach at the University of Arizona.

 

Her career started to gain significant and sustained momentum. In 1989, McEntire married her manager and former steel guitar player, Narvel Blackstock. The couple wed in a private ceremony on a boat in Lake Tahoe. Together, the pair took over all aspects of McEntire's career, forming Starstruck Entertainment, which was originally designed to help manage her career. From her second marriage, McEntire inherited three stepchildren - Chassidy, Shawna, and Brandon - and then gave birth to a son, Shelby Steven McEntire Blackstock, in February 1990. On August 3, 2015, it was announced in a joint statement on McEntire's website that she and Blackstock had been separated for a few months after twenty-six years of marriage. McEntire announced in December 2015 that their divorce was final on October 28, 2015. Despite the divorce, McEntire remains very close to her three stepchildren as well as the Blackstock family. She adores her stepchildren's six children and considers them her grandchildren.

McEntire's stepson Brandon Blackstock is married to singer Kelly Clarkson. Speaking about their impending marriage in 2013, McEntire stated she was "thrilled to death, thrilled to death. To have my buddy as my daughter-in-law, I mean, who could ask for more?"

(Picture: Narvel Blackstock, Reba McEntire, Kelly Clarkson & Shelby Steven McEntire Blackstock)

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Music video by Reba McEntire performing Somebody. (C) 2003 MCA Nashville

Audio hochgeladen am 25.12.2008

 

Veröffentlicht am 17.03.2016

Reba McEntire - Me & Bobby McGee Live@ Life & Songs of Kris Kristofferson 

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Veröffentlicht am 25.12.2013

 

 

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Music video by Reba McEntire, Vince Gill performing The Heart Won't Lie. (C) 1992 MCA Nashville

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Music video by Reba McEntire performing Forever Love. (C) 1998 MCA Nashville

Veröffentlicht am 24.03.2012

 

Audio hochgeladen 24.12.2007

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Music video by Reba McEntire, Kelly Clarkson performing Because Of You. (C) 2007 MCA Nashville

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Music video by Reba McEntire performing If You See Him, If You See Her. (C) 1998 MCA Nashville



by Lisa Konicki | @LisaKon127  |  January 9, 2017

Reba McEntire Says Singing With Mom and Sisters on New Gospel Album Was

“Too Much Fun”

There’s a new gospel singer in town and her name is Reba McEntire. Everyone’s favorite redhead is putting her vocal talents toward a new gospel album, Sing It Now: Songs of Faith & Hope, set to be released on Feb. 3. The album will be a two-disc offering containing 20 songs, both classic and original. Disc 1 will feature classic gospel songs like “Amazing Grace,” “How Great Thou Art, and “I’ll Fly Away,” while Disc 2 will be filled with original cuts such as “God and My Girlfriends,” “Sing It Now,” and “I Got The Lord On My Side.”

 

One of the standout tracks on Disc 1 is the classic tune “I’ll Fly Away” -  a song Reba grew up singing. For the version on the album, Reba waited to record the song until her mother, Jackie, and sisters, Susie and Alice, were in Nashville and could lend their harmonies.

 

“[It was] too much fun,” Reba tells Nash Country Daily about the recording session. “We were just silly as we could be. We all got around the microphone and Susie and I - we were up there just 


singing our little hearts out and Mama and Alice just kept backing up,” she laughs. “They’re not used to it, saying, ‘Oh, we don’t want to be on tape, we can’t sing.’ I’d say, ‘Oh, get up here.’ It was so fun.”

But that’s not the extent of Mama McEntire’s talent in the studio. While recording the song “I Got the Lord on My 


Side” - the only song on the album written by Reba—the McEntire matriarch made a suggestion to her daughter that would, as Reba puts it, “enhance” the song.

“She enhanced the song tremendously,” said Reba. “[The song] was ‘I Got the Lord on My Side’ because I had written it. We got in to record it and Mama said, ‘Could I make a suggestion?’ I said, ‘Sure, what is it?’ She said, ‘Instead of saying I got the Lord on my side or I’m so happy, why don’t you say you got the Lord on your side and you’re so happy. And I said, ‘Well, that’s a great idea,’ so we went back in and recorded it again like she wanted us to do and I gave her a writer’s credit. So now I can say, Mama and I wrote this song!”

 

If you’re happy / You got the Lord on your side / If you’re happy / You got the Lord on your side / If I see that big ol’ happy printed smile on your face / I know you’re happy / You got the Lord on your side.

 

Listen to Reba singing “Oh, How I Love Jesus,” from her upcoming album, Sing It Now: Songs of Faith & Hope.


by Lisa Konicki | @LisaKon127  |  December 22, 2016

Listen To Reba, Kelly Clarkson and Trisha Yearwood Sing “Softly and Tenderly” From Reba’s Upcoming Gospel Album

Another of the classic hymns found on the album is “Softly and Tenderly,” which Reba recorded with her daughter-in-law Kelly Clarkson and good friend Trisha Yearwood.

 

“Sing It Now was the perfect title for this album because the message and melody throughout the song connects the dots between the traditional hymns I grew up on and new music that has been uplifting for me in challenging times,” said Reba.

 

“Softly and Tenderly” can be found on iTunes, available for download now. Listen to Reba, Kelly and Trisha’s heavenly version of “Softly and Tenderly.”

With the announcement of her new gospel album, Sing It Now: Songs of Faith & Hope, being released on Feb. 3, Reba McEntire is offering up the song, “Softly and Tenderly,” to her fans.

 

The album, co-produced by Rascal Flatts’ Jay DeMarcus and band leader/musical director Doug Sisemore, is a two-disc offering that will contain classic hymns and original songs.

 

“It’s a double album,” said Reba. “One album has 10 hymns on it, songs that I grew up singing all my life. And the other one are 10 brand-new songs. Music conjures up great memories and goes hand and hand with us McEntires. Mama, Susie and Alice even came into the studio with me to record ‘I’ll Fly Away,’ all of us gathered around an old hymnal straight from the Chockie church.”

 

 




20160803

*Immanuel Kant